Peaks of lather.

Our tallow shaving soaps are made with the finest ingredients, including plenty of stearic acid, grass fed beef tallow, coconut oil, kokum butter, and castor oil. All of the tallow soaps also contain lanolin (wool fat) to protect the skin while shaving. We also try to cure the soaps as long as possible, but increased demand means that a quick cure at your home will make the soap last longer. Because of the high kokum butter content as well as the presence of lanolin and the fact that water evaporates from the soap during the curing process, it is advantageous to soak the puck in hot water first before smushing it into your container. After the puck has been soaked and smushed, pour a very thin layer of hot water (hot is best) over the top of the soap and let it sit. You don’t want to use too much because this will degrade the quality of your lather and produce a lather filled with air bubbles (bad), but you want to use enough to work up a nice,¬†meringue like lather devoid of bubbles that is stable during the duration of your shave. If you do not use sufficient water the lather will not become thick enough and you will basically just be left with a small blob of soap on your brush and not much else (eg ‘hard to lather’). Depending on your brush you will have to play around with the amount of water that works best for you but I have found using a high quality synthetic brush that has also soaked in hot water to prime that if I lightly coat the surface of the pre-soaked puck with hot water and use a flick of the wrist to shake out any excess water from the brush that I can make a circular motion around the container to load the brush and produce an abundance of thick, rich, dense, bubble free lather that lasts and lasts. The photos below were taken about 15 mins after ¬†the lather was produced, but I can leave them overnight and nothing changes other than they feel sort of crusty on the top from being exposed to air. The first photo really just shows my super cute whale mug. I like it.

I used a shaving mug to build the lather, but you can also use your hand.

I used a shaving mug to build the lather, but you can also use your hand.

This photo shows the meringue-like consistency of the tallow shaving soap lather that you can produce with the proper technique and a little bit of patience.

This is a photo of lather built from our tallow soap. You can make stiff, meringue like peaks with the proper loading technique.

This is a photo of lather built from our tallow soap. You can make stiff, meringue like peaks with the proper loading technique.

Just playing around with my camera here – zooming in on the top peak. Loaded brush in the background.

This is another photo of the peaks made with the tallow soap.

This is another photo of the peaks made with the tallow soap.

Yet another peak shot. To make the lather I loaded the soap onto the brush and created the lather in the whale bowl. I then squeezed it off of the brush with my hand and created the peaks with my finger to illustrate just how stiff the lather really is.

Fluffy little clouds! That is what our shaving soap lather looks like.

Fluffy little clouds! That is what our shaving soap lather looks like.

Yet another peak photo, with brush in the background.

More lather peaks.

More lather peaks.

I think this is the best peak shot – zooming in and focusing finally worked!

Peaks of lather.

Peaks of lather.

This is an arial shot of the lathering bowl (bottom left), puck and container containing ‘smushed’ soap (top left), loaded brush with fluffy little clouds (top right), and puck in container coated with lather (bottom right).

This photo shows a puck of tallow soap smushed into a container, a bowl full of lather, lather on another shaving puck, and lather on the brush.

This photo shows a puck of tallow soap smushed into a container, a bowl full of lather, lather on another shaving puck, and lather on the brush.

A close up of the brush loaded with lather. I use a high quality synthetic brush, it is so soft. I have these for sale on my website for $12. Yes, a quality synthetic brush can be affordable!

Lather, close up.

Lather, close up.

The photo below is of the bowl I used to build the lather. To do this, first follow the directions at the beginning of the post with soaking the puck (behind the bowl in this photo) and loading the brush, then rotate the brush using the bowl as leverage, pulling off lather periodically and placing it on the side of the bowl as you continue to build even more lather, before finally filling the entire bowl with lather.

Lather, close up, in the shaving cup. Just for fun I tried to make it look like waves.

Lather, close up, in the shaving cup. Just for fun I tried to make it look like waves.

Another brush shot, with stable lather. These photos were taken approximately 15 minutes after the lather was created, but if I leave the brush out overnight it will look like this in the morning.

A quality brush and just the right amount of water are imperative to building the proper lather.

A quality brush and just the right amount of water are imperative to building the proper lather.

Final photo – cup, puck, brush, and another puck.

Another photo of the lather bowls and shaving soap.

Another photo of the lather bowls and shaving soap.

I hope you have enjoyed seeing some photos of the lather that you can easily create with our tallow shaving soaps with the proper technique and just a little bit of patience. Happy shaving!

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One thought on “Tallow Shaving Soap – How to Achieve the Perfect Lather

  1. I just got some of your tallow shave soap today in my order, which was a nice surprise! It looks like this lathers amazingly well. I’ve only tried the vegan shave soap thus far so this will be fun to try.

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